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2 Minnesota men are suspected of drug crimes

On Behalf of | Apr 1, 2021 | Criminal defense |

Minnesota police paid a visit to a particular residence and left with numerous items in their possession. Investigators claim to have seized illegal drugs at the residence. Two men, ages 22 and 18, were arrested and are now facing criminal charges for drug crimes.

A search warrant was reportedly executed

If police officers request entry to a home to search the premises, they typically must first obtain an authorized search warrant. In this case, investigators say they executed a search warrant on a recent Wednesday. It was during that search that they claim to have discovered a substantial amount of marijuana, mushrooms and other illegal drugs.

Cash and weapons also on the list of seized items

Investigators also say they found more than $10,000 in cash as well as two firearms at the residence in addition to the supposed illegal drugs. Besides a fifth-degree possession charge, police say additional charges are pending against the two defendants. As in all cases of suspected drug crimes, each defendant is guaranteed an opportunity to refute the charges against him.

Criminal defense strategy is the key to mitigation

Being charged with a drug crime in Minnesota or elsewhere is a serious issue that can not only affect a person’s immediate daily life but his or her future, as well. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help a defendant explore his or her options for a defense strategy, which can often help mitigate the circumstances of a particular case. For example, if a person’s identity was mistaken upon arrest, this would undoubtedly have a significant impact on the outcome of a case if the defendant in question can prove that he or she is not the person the prosecutor claims him or her to be.